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2009-10 Conversations in Science 

Please note: Clicking on a video thumbnail will take you to the MMSD-TV website to view the video.

CHIMERAS AND THE EDGES OF THE HUMAN

April 8, 2010

Speaker: Jill Casid (UW-Madison, Dept. of Art History)

Current representations of transplantation reflect colonial taxonomies of race, gender, and sex, with colonial hierarchies of what is 'human' and what counts as 'culture,' and with early modern practices of what Michel Foucault called 'biopower'.

Exploring this history helps to recast concerns about the new forms of biological power and the seemingly monstrous possibilities for cross-species hybridization and transformation.

video from Conversations in Science series

THE "SCIENCE" OF COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: 
NEW APPROACHES TO BRIDGING THE SCIENCE-PUBLIC DIVIDE

March 11, 2010

Speaker: Dietram Scheufele (UW-Madison, Dept. of Life Sciences Communication)

Modern democracies have long been faced with difficulties in communicating science, engineering and medicine to the general public. This problem received renewed attention from policymakers and academics in recent years, given the fact that issues, such as stem cell research, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology, have increasingly merged the realms of science and politics. More competitive funding environments and political opposition to specific areas of research have further exacerbated the need for building public support for science and for better communication about emerging technologies.

This conversation was designed to answer some of the key questions about how to close what seem to be widening rifts between science and the public. How can we establish sustainable channels of communication, for instance, between science and the public, especially as issues like global warming, nanotechnology, regenerative medicine, and agricultural biotechnology are increasingly blurring the lines between science, society and politics? And how do citizens make sense of the ethical, legal, and social challenges that come with the rapid scientific development in areas like synthetic biology?

WHAT BABIES KNOW

February 11, 2010

Presenter: Lewis Leavitt (UW-Madison, Dept. of Pediatrics)

A review of child development research of interest to educators including early language and social development and an examination how this research can be helpful to classroom teachers.

View the Video

USING ULTRASOUND TO EVALUATE ARTERIAL AGE

January 14, 2010

Presenter: Dr. James Stein (UW-Madison, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine)

UW-Madison's Dr. James Stein reviews the current state of cardiovascular disease risk prediction and its limitations, focusing on the use of carotid ultrasound as a potential tool to help improve risk prediction.

video from Conversations in Science series

THE MORAL TALES OF NATURE FILMS

December 10, 2009

Presenter: Gregg Mitman (UW-Madison, Nelson Institute for Environmental Study)

New media technologies have opened up the possibilities for new material, new voices, and new points of view. Outside the powerful networks of film distribution and promotion, new relationships across art, science, and activism are being forged, helping to create media that matters in the lives of people and animals throughout the world.

video from Conversations in Science series

SLEEP AND THE BRAIN

November 19, 2009

Presenter: Chiara Cirelli (UW-Madison, Dept. of Psychiatry)

Recent evidence suggests that sleep has a core function involving the brain and might be identifiable at the cellular level.

video from Conversations in Science series

ANTILOGUOUS HARMONY IN CHEMISTRY AND MUSIC

October 15, 2009

Presenter: John Berry (UW-Madison, Dept. of Chemistry)

Find out how art and science inspire each other through a study of 'antilogous harmony,' or the juxtaposition of two dissimilar things. Hear what happens when tuba and piano are combined in a sonata.

video from Conversations in Science series

SCIENCE, RELIGION & JEWISH THOUGHT

Presenter: Steven Nadler (UW-Madison, Dept. of Philosophy)

What does Judaism have to say about the relationship between science and religion?

This lecture considers Maimonides' attempts to resolve the perplexity of someone who is both religiously devout and scientifically informed, and discusses how the Jewish worldview can be understood in naturalistic and rationalistic terms.

video from Conversations in Science series

2009-10 Conversations in Science 

Please note: Clicking on a video thumbnail will take you to the MMSD-TV website to view the video.

CHIMERAS AND THE EDGES OF THE HUMAN

April 8, 2010

Speaker: Jill Casid (UW-Madison, Dept. of Art History)

Current representations of transplantation reflect colonial taxonomies of race, gender, and sex, with colonial hierarchies of what is 'human' and what counts as 'culture,' and with early modern practices of what Michel Foucault called 'biopower'.

Exploring this history helps to recast concerns about the new forms of biological power and the seemingly monstrous possibilities for cross-species hybridization and transformation.

video from Conversations in Science series

THE "SCIENCE" OF COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: 
NEW APPROACHES TO BRIDGING THE SCIENCE-PUBLIC DIVIDE

March 11, 2010

Speaker: Dietram Scheufele (UW-Madison, Dept. of Life Sciences Communication)

Modern democracies have long been faced with difficulties in communicating science, engineering and medicine to the general public. This problem received renewed attention from policymakers and academics in recent years, given the fact that issues, such as stem cell research, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology, have increasingly merged the realms of science and politics. More competitive funding environments and political opposition to specific areas of research have further exacerbated the need for building public support for science and for better communication about emerging technologies.

This conversation was designed to answer some of the key questions about how to close what seem to be widening rifts between science and the public. How can we establish sustainable channels of communication, for instance, between science and the public, especially as issues like global warming, nanotechnology, regenerative medicine, and agricultural biotechnology are increasingly blurring the lines between science, society and politics? And how do citizens make sense of the ethical, legal, and social challenges that come with the rapid scientific development in areas like synthetic biology?

WHAT BABIES KNOW

February 11, 2010

Presenter: Lewis Leavitt (UW-Madison, Dept. of Pediatrics)

A review of child development research of interest to educators including early language and social development and an examination how this research can be helpful to classroom teachers.

View the Video

USING ULTRASOUND TO EVALUATE ARTERIAL AGE

January 14, 2010

Presenter: Dr. James Stein (UW-Madison, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine)

UW-Madison's Dr. James Stein reviews the current state of cardiovascular disease risk prediction and its limitations, focusing on the use of carotid ultrasound as a potential tool to help improve risk prediction.

video from Conversations in Science series

THE MORAL TALES OF NATURE FILMS

December 10, 2009

Presenter: Gregg Mitman (UW-Madison, Nelson Institute for Environmental Study)

New media technologies have opened up the possibilities for new material, new voices, and new points of view. Outside the powerful networks of film distribution and promotion, new relationships across art, science, and activism are being forged, helping to create media that matters in the lives of people and animals throughout the world.

video from Conversations in Science series

SLEEP AND THE BRAIN

November 19, 2009

Presenter: Chiara Cirelli (UW-Madison, Dept. of Psychiatry)

Recent evidence suggests that sleep has a core function involving the brain and might be identifiable at the cellular level.

video from Conversations in Science series

ANTILOGUOUS HARMONY IN CHEMISTRY AND MUSIC

October 15, 2009

Presenter: John Berry (UW-Madison, Dept. of Chemistry)

Find out how art and science inspire each other through a study of 'antilogous harmony,' or the juxtaposition of two dissimilar things. Hear what happens when tuba and piano are combined in a sonata.

video from Conversations in Science series

SCIENCE, RELIGION & JEWISH THOUGHT

Presenter: Steven Nadler (UW-Madison, Dept. of Philosophy)

What does Judaism have to say about the relationship between science and religion?

This lecture considers Maimonides' attempts to resolve the perplexity of someone who is both religiously devout and scientifically informed, and discusses how the Jewish worldview can be understood in naturalistic and rationalistic terms.

video from Conversations in Science series